Roman Archaeology teaching for diversity and inclusion: or what a difference 10 weeks makes

Dr Zena Kamash FSA, Senior Lecturer in Roman Archaeology, Dept of Classics, Royal Holloway Zena.Kamash@rhul.ac.uk @ZenaKamash In 2019 I was invited to give the keynote lecture at the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference that would take place that year in Canterbury, Kent, UK. I immediately knew that I wanted to talk about diversity and inclusion inContinue reading “Roman Archaeology teaching for diversity and inclusion: or what a difference 10 weeks makes”

Working towards fairer access to Classical subjects in schools: the Advocating Classics Education (ACE) project

By Dr Peter Swallow and Dr Arlene Holmes-Henderson Access to the study of Classical subjects in schools relies on ‘wealth or luck’ (Hunt and Holmes-Henderson, 2021). The availability of Latin, Greek, Ancient History or Classical Civilisation (the four subjects available as qualifications in English schools) at GCSE or A Level invariably depends on what kindContinue reading “Working towards fairer access to Classical subjects in schools: the Advocating Classics Education (ACE) project”

CUCD EDI Statement on the threat to close Sheffield’s Department of Archaeology

The CUCD EDI committee condemns the recent revelation that the Department of Archaeology in Sheffield is under threat of closure. Following an internal review of the department’s staffing needs, the University Executive Board informed the Department that a vote regarding its future would be held on 25th May. The following options are: (A) support andContinue reading “CUCD EDI Statement on the threat to close Sheffield’s Department of Archaeology”

WYSIWYG Classics, Or: Making Roman diversity visible, audible, and accessible for 21st century audiences

image credit:  Fabien Dany – http://www.fabiendany.com  Peter Kruschwitz What do we want to see (and do we have a choice)? WYSIWYG – What You See Is What You Get – is an acronym with a long history. It was especially important during the infant days of the computing age: programmes that allowed you to viewContinue reading “WYSIWYG Classics, Or: Making Roman diversity visible, audible, and accessible for 21st century audiences”

Working-Class Classics: Myths, Stories and Experiences

Lilah Grace Canevaro and Mirko Canevaro ‘Working-Class Classics: A Conversation’ took place on Thursday 22nd April. The event featured 10 speakers and was attended by over 60 people. The presentations were impassioned, the discussion equally so, and the sharing of war stories had a powerful impact. We heard from undergraduates, postgraduates, postdocs and academics atContinue reading “Working-Class Classics: Myths, Stories and Experiences”

Classical Association Inclusive Classics Panel 2021

Alexia Petsalis-Diomidis and Barbara Goff In April 2021, the Classical Association opened its annual conference – held online this year due to the pandemic – with a panel on Inclusive Classics. Inspired in part by the ‘Towards a more inclusive Classics’ workshop held in June 2020, the panel was convened and run by the InclusiveContinue reading “Classical Association Inclusive Classics Panel 2021”

Be Aware or Beware? The Pitfalls of Autism Awareness Month

By Cora Beth Fraser T.S. Eliot got it right; April is indeed the cruellest month, for autistic people at any rate… Oh, hold on – I’ve just been handed an Institutional Script in a Cheerful Font! Let me just adjust my tone… It’s April, and that means it’s Autism Awareness Month (or Week, or Day,Continue reading “Be Aware or Beware? The Pitfalls of Autism Awareness Month”

Classics and the Unprotected Characteristic: Towards a Network of Working-Class Classicists

Lilah Grace Canevaro and Mirko Canevaro, University of Edinburgh Class is not listed as a protected characteristic in the Equality Act 2010. Class is not necessarily visible, and it is not always talked about. But class plays a crucial role in both access to university and the university experience. The class divide is particularly evidentContinue reading “Classics and the Unprotected Characteristic: Towards a Network of Working-Class Classicists”

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